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Feminisms and Cultural Politics of Emotions



Date:
January 27-29, 2009

Deadline for application:
December 6, 2008

Venue:
Lund University, Sweden

Teachers:
Dr. Clare Hemmings, London School of Economics, UK
Prof. Tiina Rosenberg, Lund University, Sweden
Dr. Dorthe Staunæs, DPU/University of Århus, Aarhus, Denmark

Coordinators:
Prof. Tiina Rosenberg - in collaboration with Director of the Research
School, Prof. Nina Lykke, Linkoeping University, Sweden.

Course description:
The course will give an overview of recent approaches to the analysis of emotions and affects, and, in particular, put focus on feminist
interventions in current theoretical debates on the 'turn to affects'
and on the importance of studying cultural and political meanings of
emotions.
There has been a major change in feminist cultural studies on affect, feeling and emotion. Emerging from the mutuality of our
relationships, and especially our interdependence with others, feminist
cultural studies on affect, feeling and emotion have restarted to
analyse how hope, commitment, collective, survivalist and reparative
strategies take place in different cultural and social contexts.
Feminist cultural studies have also analysed how emotions today are
part of management strategies involving new social technologies, where power appears in subtle forms. Against these backgrounds, the course will put focus on questions such as: What do emotions do to/with us, not only emotionally but physically as well? How do emotions move between bodies? What does the 'turn to affects' imply in cultural theory? What does it mean to write an affective historiography of feminism? How can we analyse the effects of the new organisational affective turn and the ways in which gendered and ethnic-racialised patterns (dis)appear?
Special attention will be given to different kinds of analytical
examples, which can illustrate ways in which to study emotions from
feminist perspectives.

The course will include two kinds of sessions:
1)lecture-discussion-sessions,
2) group sessions with presentations of students' papers, where students are given the opportunity to present their doctoral research and receive comments from teachers and co-participants.


Programme:

Arrival January 26 (evening).

Day 1 (January 27)

9.00-9.15 Registration and coffee
9.15-9.30 Welcome and round of introductions
9.30-11-30: Lecture and discussion:
Clare Hemmings:
Affective Historiographies: When do Feminists Feel?
11.30-12.30 Lunch
12.30-14.30 Discussion with Clare Hemmings of the readings related to lecture
14.30-15.00 Coffee break
15.00-18.30 Group sessions with presentation and discussion of
students' papers:
Group 1, led by Clare Hemmings
Group 2, led by Tiina Rosenberg
Group 3, led by Dorthe Staunæs
19.00 Dinner


Day 2 (January 28)

9.30-11.30 Lecture and discussion:
Tiina Rosenberg: Queer Feelings: Zarah Leander and the Gay Diva Worship in Postwar Sweden
11.30-12.30 Lunch
12.30-14.30 Discussion with Tiina Rosenberg of the readings related to lecture
14.30-15.00 Coffee break
15.00-18.30 Group sessions with presentation and discussion of
students' papers:
Group 1, led by Clare Hemmings
Group 2, led by Tiina Rosenberg
Group 3, led by Dorthe Staunæs
19.00 Dinner


Day 3 (January 29)

9.30-11.30 Lecture and discussion:
Dorthe Staunæs: Affective turns in management and organisations. Strategies of analysis and stuck places involved
11.30-12.30 Lunch
12.30-14.30 Discussion with Dorthe Staunæs of the readings related to lecture
14.30-15.00 Coffee break
15.00-16.00 Course evaluation
Departure

Readings:

Key readings for all three lectures:
* Sara Ahmed, The Cultural Politics of Emotion, London & New York:
Routledge, 2004
* Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Touching Feeling: Affect, Pedagogy, and Performativity,/ Durham & London: Duke University Press, 2004.


Recommended readings:

For Clare Hemmings' lecture:
* Hardt, M (1999) ‘Affective Labor’. Boundary 2, 26(2).
* Lorde, A (1984) ‘Eye to Eye: Black Women, Hatred, and Anger’. Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches by Audre Lorde. Freedom, CA: The Crossing Press.
* Hemmings, C (2005) 'Invoking affect: Cultural theory and the ontological turn.' Cultural Studies 19, no. 5 (2005), pp. 548-567.
* Berlant, Lauren (2000) ‘The Subject of True Feeling: Pain, Privacy and Politics’ in Ahmed et. Al. Transformations: Thinking Through Feminism London Routledge pp.33-47
* Biddle, J (1997) ‘Shame’. Australian Feminist Studies, 12(26).
* Chow, R. (1994). Where Have All the Natives Gone? Contemporary Postcolonial Theory: A Reader. P. Mongia. London, Arnold: 123-145.
* Cvetkovich, A. (2003). C1. An Archive of Feelings: Trauma, Sexuality, and Lesbian Public Culture. Durham, NC, Duke University Press.
* Massumi, B (1996) ‘The Autonomy of Affect’. In Paul Patton (ed.): Deleuze: a Critical Reader. Oxford: Blackwell, 217-239.
* Riley, D (2005) Impersonal Passion: Language as Affect. Durham: Duke University Press.



For Tiina Rosenberg's lecture

* Brett Farmer, “The Fabulous Sublimity of Gay Diva Worship”, in: /Camera
Obscura/ 59, Volume 20, Number 2/2005.
* Richard Dyer, “Judy Garland and Gay Men”, in: /Heavenly Bodies: Film
Stars and Society/, New York & London: Routledge [1986] 2004, pp. 137-191.
* Wayne Koestenbaum, /The Queen’s Throat: Opera, Homosexuality, and the
Mystery of Desire,/ London & New York: Penguin, 1993 or a later edition.



For Dorthe Staunæs' lecture:
* Blackman, L. (2008) Affect, Relationality and the ‘problem of personality’. Theory, Culture, Society vol. 25. no. 1: 23-47 (24p
* Clough, P. T. (2008) The Affective Turn: Political Economy, Biomedia and Bodies. Theory, Culture, Society, vol. 25. No.: 1-22. (21p
* Contu, A. (2007) Decaf Resistance. On Misbehaviour, Cynicism, and Desire in Liberal Workplaces. Management Communication, Quarterly. Vol. 21. No. 3: 364-374 (10p)
* Foucault, M. (2000) Technologies of the self. In Foucault, M. Ethics. Essential works of Foucault 1954-1984. Vol. 1. ed. By P. Rabinow, p. 223-252 (30p)
* Foucault, M. (2000) Governmentality. In Foucault, M. Power. Essential works of Foucault 1954-1984. Vol. 3. ed. By P. Rabinow, p. 201-224 (22p)
* Gorton, K. (2007) Theorizing emotions and affect: Feminist engagements. Feminist theory, vol. 8. No. 3: 333-348 (15p)
* Hemmings, C. (2007): Invoking affect. Cultural theory and the ontological turn. Cultural Studies Vol. 19, No. 5: 548-567 (19p)
* Staunæs, D. & D.M. Søndergaard (2009 in press): Intersectionality – a theoretical adjustment. In Lykke, Griffin and Buikemae: Researching differently. (Forthcoming.)
* Staunæs, D. (2008 submit.) Subversive strategies of analysis – or dressing up governmentality. p. 1-27 (27p)
* Wetherell, M. (2008) Subjectivity or psycho-discursive practices? Investigating complex intersectional identities. Subjectivity Vol. 22: 73-81 (8p)



Lectures - abstracts:


Clare Hemmings:
Affective Historiographies: When do Feminists Feel?

This lecture takes two approaches to thinking about affect from a feminist perspective. The first engages the 'turn to affect' that frames cultural theory as inattentive to questions of 'bio-life'. I argue that to do so, the 'turn to affect' requires the evacuation of feminist and critical race perspectives from cultural theory, writing a feminist history I am uncomfortable with endorsing. In response to this discomfort, the second approach looks instead at how affects might be integrated into feminist history in a less linear, more creative way. Here I look at feminist rage and horror as starting points for occupying feminist history imaginatively.



Tiina Rosenberg:
Queer Feelings: Zarah Leander and the Gay Diva Worship in Postwar Sweden

This lecture discusses Zarah Leander as a queer diva in the way the
“phenomenon Leander” emerged in the 1950s and 1960s in Sweden, Germany
and internationally. Leander’s dark voice, /travestie/-like persona and
her /schlager/ repertoire made her a major gay icon in the 1950s. The
queer quality of Leander is to be found in her transgressive erotic
representation of her vocal gender ambiguity, transformed in the gay
male diva worship into counter-political resistance to “normalcy”. This
lecture deals merely with gay male Leander worship, but Leander also had
her lesbian following. Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick calls these survivalist
dynamics of queer culture “reparative” in the sense given to the term in
object relation theory as an affirmative impulse to repair or make good
the losses of subjective constitution. “Because there can be terrible
surprises, however, there can also be good ones. Hope, often a
fracturing, even traumatic thing to experience, is among the energies by
which the reparatively positioned reader tries to organise the fragments
and part-objects she encounters and creates.” (Kosofsky Sedgwick, 2004: 146)



Dorthe Staunæs:
Affective management. Strategies of analysis and stuck places involved

In organisations of today, affects and emotions are no longer something we just live by and through. Rather affects and emotions are cultivated and managed. In the pursuit of ”value added”, private companies as well as public institutions introduces different kinds of affective management with the purpose of making the members of the organisation feeling for instance more ”authentic or ”empathic” and thereby manage and correct themselves, their anger and other undesirable emotions. Professionalized affective management involves new social technologies, where power appears in subtle forms as for instance in professional dialogues, learning games and practices of evaluation, just like new actors as for instance children and horses seem to get installed in powerful positions and challenge old organisational boundaries and hierarchies. Against this background, the lecture will focus on the following questions: How can we analyse the effects of this new organisational affective turn and how do gendered and ethnic-racialised patterns (dis)appear? Which strategies of analysis are productive and which analytical stuck places, can we encounter?


(Participants must purchase or borrow the 2 books listed as key readings for all lectures. No reader will be sent out. Only 3 articles,
the one by Hemmings (2007) "Invoking affect", and those by Staunaes (2008 and 2009) will be sent out as attachments.)







Applicants:
23 applicants, 21 participants: DK/Czech Republic 1, Finland 5, Iceland 2, Norway 2, Poland 1, Portugal 1, Russia 1, Slovakia 1, Sweden 7.


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Last updated: Thu Jan 20 12:42:52 CET 2011